Tag Archives: anthrax

Why The CDC is Incompetent and Not to be Trusted

THE CDC makes no sense.  It says it did everything right with respect to the Dallas Ebola victim, that he did not exhibit symptoms when he boarded a plane in Liberia and came to the U.S.  Considering the fact that there is a 21-day incubation period for the disease, he (and all travelers) should have been in quarantine for three weeks PRIOR to boarding the plane in the first place.

JULY 2014 – Six vials of smallpox were discovered in a storage room at an unguarded FDA lab in Maryland that once belonged to the US National Institutes of Health.  In all  they found 12 boxes containing 327 vials labelled with various unpleasant pathogens, from influenza and dengue fever to rickettsia and Q fever.

JUNE 20, 2014 – Anthrax Scare:  84 workers at CDC’s Atlanta headquarters were exposed to the deadly bacterium, Bacillus anthracis, after a breach at the agency’s Bioterrorism Rapid Response and Advanced Technology Laboratory. The number of workers being monitored for anthrax was revised from 75 when the lab breach was announced The previous Thursday.  Workers followed the wrong procedure to “inactivate” batches of Bacillus anthracis, the bacterium that causes anthrax. The agency came under attack on June 13 for “serious” airflow problems in its  Atlanta building that houses anthrax, SARS and monkeypox.  It stems from a poorly engineered airflow system in Building 18..

MARCH 2014 – Staffers sent samples of a fairly harmless strain of bird flu to scientists at the US Department of Agriculture. To the agricultural team’s alarm, every chicken they infected with the virus died. It was only after 21 birds had succumbed that they discovered why: the CDC samples had been contaminated with a strain of highly lethal H5N1 bird flu. Natural outbreaks of the virus have killed hundreds of people in Asia.

At least three different incidents between 2007 and 2012 called into question the CDC’s laboratory safety and security systems, which are designed to keep dangerous pathogens like smallpox, monkey pox and SARS from escaping into the general population.

In 2007, backup generators failed to keep airflow systems working during a power outage.

In 2008, the door to a lab housing Coxiella Burnetii was found to be sealed with duct tape after a ventilation system malfunction. Nine workers were tested for the bacterium, which causes Q fever, but none were infected.

2009-2010 – Security doors were left unlocked to an area where experiments occur with dangerous germs.  “The doors in question here are but one layer of multiple layers of security when it comes to both the animals and the agents that are worked on,” CDC spokesman Tom Skinner said at the time.

There are probably more stupid breaches.  This just goes to show that when the agency says it knows what it’s doing and tries to assure all of us that it does it’s just plain nonsense.

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